Gunkholes

If you’re not familiar with the term, here’s a pretty good piece from Sail Magazine The Fine Art of Gunkholing.

According to dictionary.com, the term has been around since 1905 and first appeared in Yachting Magazine in 1908:

gunkhole

noun: We found a nice gunkhole near the Kennebec

verb: To cruise rivers, creeks, tidal estuaries, etc, in a small yacht, anchoring in remote spots (1908+ Yachting).

My Buzzard’s Bay Gunkholes

Buzzards Bay is a serious body of water and I think that’s what makes it’s limited number of gunkholes so precious. Most afternoons, it’s blowing 15-20 and there’s plenty of steep chop. Rather than beat your brains out trying to get home from The Vineyard or Newport, why not duck into a protected cove, drop an anchor, and enjoy the day and wait until after four to head home after the wind dies down.

Below are links to my reports on the most popular gunkholes i’ve visited…

Hadley Harbor

Quissett Harbor

Tarpaulin Cove

Bassetts Island

Menemsha – Dock, Gunkhole, and Dine

Kittanset Cove

Cuttyhunk

Weepeckett Islands

Gooseberry Island – Newport Rhode Island

Raynes Cove – Kittery Maine

I also have a number of less popular hangouts I can recommend but just haven’t gotten around reports just yet.

If you’re in a hurry and want to know more, just email me at davidjameshorne@gmail.com.

Sandwich Beach
Sakonnett River
Cuttyhunk
Lake Tasmoo